Tag Archives: Illustration

Beautiful Beatles prints by Oliver Barrett

17 Sep

Designer and illustrator Oliver Barrett has created these four posters for the Charting The Beatles project. The site of the project features some very interesting and complex information graphics that are really worth checking (here), but I was drawn to the simplicity and beautiful colors of Barrett’s prints. The delicate and very well crafted illustrations show the instruments that each band member played. And I really appreciated the fact that he illustrated some lesser known, not exactly iconic, images of the Fab Four.

“These four illustrations are for the Charting the Beatles project. I chose to create complex portraits of each member from my favorite era of their careers. In addition to the portraits, I depicted each member’s array (or lack of in Ringo’s case) of instruments through vector silhouettes.”

(via Flavorwire)

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Ricardo Cavolo’s illustrated interview

7 Sep

Amazingly talented illustrator Ricardo Cavolo has shared a drawn interview on his site. Using just two colors, he illustrated his love for Mexico, his favorite quote, his passion for illustration (without it, he’d be a cadaver), and how he thinks that art makes the world prettier. All beautifully done!
Make sure to check his site for more of his interesting art, he’s got a distinctive style filled with symbolism and that’s very colorful and rich in details.

Andrew Kolb’s swap cards for SuperIam8bit and David Bowie children’s book

31 Aug

Andrew Kolb is an illustrator with a very distinctive playful style and an extremely beautiful treatment of color. I just came across his contribution to the show SuperIam8bit (I already blogged about Aled Lewis’s pieces for that show ). He drew inspiration from classic video games to create an installation of a set of swap cards. It’s a very nice and creative concept that offers the visitors of the show the amount of interactivity and fun expected.

Among his other surprising and whimsical projects, Kolb decided to create a children’s book out of the song Space Oddity by David Bowie.

“Have you ever listened to a song and your mind’s eye is immediately filled with visuals?
David Bowie’s classic space epic is one such song for me. Every lyric paints such a vivid picture that I figured “Oh hey, I guess I’ll make that into a children’s book!” Yes, I talk like this.”

He illustrated the lyrics of the song in a very sweet way that ultimately is opposed to the way the song plays out in the end. I like the song (and naturally, Bowie himself) so I found his visualization quite appealing, nicely executed and a bit bittersweet. I think I want to see more good songs turned into books!
There is no physical copy of the book, but it’s available for free download on Kolb’s site so make sure you head on here to get it.

UPDATE: The download link for the book is now removed from the artist’s site, and it is referred to as a “picture book set in space”. Copyrights have no sense of humor or appreciation for good illustration. I’m just glad I was able to download it before.

MWM’s free form flow

31 Aug

Artist MWM shared on his blog the wall he painted during a graffiti jam in Moscow. Reone, his moniker, is tagged in a free style manner with cursive letters as opposed to his more intricate geometric designs. I have to say I have a personal preference for his impressive colorful patterns, but the way this mural is executed is absolutely beautiful. I love the organic way in which the letters come together merging with the dots and colors, and how he used the windows to set the rhythm of the word instead of it having a dividing and splitting effect.

Conrad Roset fan tattoos

30 Aug

Some fans of the illustrator Conrad Roset have tattooed his muses on them. I absolutely love his work especially his muses, I find the lines and colors to be just exquisite. And they work really well as tattoos, while keeping that distinct expressive quality to them.

(via Conrad Roset’s blog)

Aled Lewis mashes up 8bit games and classic paintings

16 Aug

Designer and illustrator Aled Lewis (Aled Knows Best) is taking part in the Super Iam8bit show where over 100 artists revisit the 80’s gaming world. The show itself seems quite interesting and entertaining with the right mix of retro, games and fun. Take a look at the flyer below designed by Dave Crosland

Aled Lewis has a few new pieces for the show, in which classic 8 bit games meet famous paintings. So, for example, Indiana Jones is exploring the land of melted clocks in Dali’s painting, and Guybrush (from The Secret of Monkey Island) finds himself on a Van Gogh-ian terrace. Witty as always!

Divine Intervention (Police Quest: In Pursuit of the Death Angel (1987) - and Leonardo da Vinci’s ‘The Last Supper’)

 

How Appropriate. You Fight Like A Post-Impressionist (The Secret of Monkey Island (1990) - and Vincent Van Gogh’s ‘Cafe Terrace On The Place Du Forum 1888’)

Just Another Sleazy Joint (Leisure Suit Larry Goes Looking for Love (in Several Wrong Places) (1988) - and Edward Hopper’s ‘Nighthawks’)

Indiana Jones and the Persistence of Memory (Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade: The Graphic Adventure (1989) - and Salvador Dali’s ‘The Persistence of Memory’)

Keep our secrets: new kids book

11 Aug

Jordan Crane’s upcoming kids book (that you can pre-order here) features some beautiful illustrations and it also makes use of thermochromatic ink: the heat-sensitive ink will change color when rubbed and reveal hidden illustrations on each page. It’s a nice concept that will definitely be engaging and entertaining for kids and adults alike.

“Two young children tour their noisy house with fresh eyes, discovering along the way that all is not as it seems. Featuring heat-sensitive, color-changing ink on every page, this book contains dozens of delightful surprises. Among them: a giant dog slumbering in a piano, a wishing puddle full of dimes, a raccoon that is actually a robot, and a camera that is secretly made of cheese.”

Brian McMullen, the art director, and his son give a preview of the book in the sweet video below.
(via Notcot)